Nutmeg

Latin:  Myristica fragrans

Family:  Myristicaceae

Parts Used:  Seed

Taste/Energetics:  Spicy, warming, drying

Properties:  Analgesic, nootropic, aphrodisiac,  anxiolytic, sedative, narcotic in excessive doses, hypotensive, circulatory stimulant

Actions:  Nutmeg is a spice that has been used since ancient times for augmenting the flavor of culinary dishes and beverages. Nutmeg has numerous compounds such as myristicin and sabinene that give it its complex aroma and medicinal effects.  As a medicine it is a circulatory stimulant and is pain relieving for conditions such as arthritis, neuralgia, etc.  As a vasodilator it is useful for lowering blood pressure and improving cardiac health.   Nutmeg is gently warming and relaxing to the stomach, making it easier to digest food.  In small doses, nutmeg is an anxiolytic, gently relaxing the body and is a traditional remedy to take in the evening in warmed milk if one has insomnia.

Dosage:   This is an herb that is traditionally offered in meals and beverages at very small doses-  a fraction of a teaspoon per serving.  In larger doses its tranquilizing effect becomes apparent.  A 1/4 of a teaspoon taken in warm milk is enough to be sedative without likely side effects.  The effects take a while to come, as much as 4-6 hours after the dose.  With increasingly larger doses (especially at a tablespoon or more) paradoxical effects can occur of both sedation but increased heart rate, restlessness and nausea.   Nutmeg is also used as an essential oil at standard dosages with usual precautions.

Contraindications:   Avoid during pregnancy and for those with low blood pressure, or heart issues in general.    Its become popular in some quarters with recreational users to consume excessive quantities (over an ounce or more) of nutmeg to induce narcotic and psychedelic effects.  Unfortunately doses of just a tablespoon can also induce irregular heartbeat, palpitations and seizures.  There are far more easier and less risky ways to get your high so please look elsewhere for that.

Further Reading:  

by Rosalee de la Foret